Right Ventricle Adaptation After an Endurance Race

Abstracts From the Third Annual Medicine & Science in Ultra- Endurance Sports Conference, August 2016, Chamonix, France

Right Ventricle Adaptation After an Endurance Race

Authors

Maria Sanz De La Garza, Daniel Brotons Cuixart, Gonzalo Gazioli, Emma Roca, Marta Sitges.

Objective.—Right ventricle (RV) dysfunction and changes in the pulmo- nary pressure has been described in athletes after endurance races. We aimed to understand the changes in the right heart response to endurance exercise, and the effects of the amount of exercise.
Methods.—Echocardiography was performed in 55 healthy adults at baseline and after a three-stage trail race: short (14 km; n = 17); medium (35 km; n = 21); and long (56 km; n = 17). Echocardiographic assessment of the RV was performed with global and separate analysis of the RV basal and apical regions.
Results.—No changes were observed in short-distance runners, RV systolic deformation decreased signi cantly (p < 0.05) after both the medium-length and long races (Δ% RV global strain: -7.6±20.1 and: -8.7±21.8, respectively) with signi cant RV dilatation (Δ% RV volume: +10.6±9.9 and +15.3±12.8, respectively). The RV basal segment made a major contribution to stroke volume during exercise, showing larger increases in size and strain as com- pared to the apex. Various patterns of RV adaptation to exercise, ranging from increases in both RV segmental strains and sizes to an insuf cient increase in size and a decrease in strain, were identi ed; this individual variability was not correlated with prior training.
Conclusions.—An acute RV impairment was demonstrated after a trail-running race, and was related to the amount of exercise. A high inter-individual variability was observed. Differences in RV adaptation patterns were independent of prior training, suggesting the in uence was due to other individual factors.

http://dx.doi.org/10.1123/IJSPP.2016-0495

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 Exercise-Induced Hypoxaemia Responses to Exercise

Exercise-Induced Hypoxaemia Developed at Sea-Level Influences Responses to Exercise at Moderate Altitude

Authors

Anne-Fleur Gaston, Fabienne Durand, Emma Roca, Grégory Doucende, Ilona Hapkova, Enric Subirats

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of exercise-induced hypoxaemia (EIH) developed at sea-level on exercise responses at moderate acute altitude.

Methods
Twenty three subjects divided in three groups of individuals: highly trained with EIH (n = 7); highly trained without EIH (n = 8) and untrained participants (n = 8) performed two maximal incremental tests at sea-level and at 2,150 m. Haemoglobin O2 saturation (SpO2), heart rate, oxygen uptake (VO2) and several ventilatory parameters were measured continuously during the tests.
Results
EIH athletes had a drop in SpO2 from 99 ± 0.8% to 91 ± 1.2% from rest to maximal exercise at sea-level, while the other groups did not exhibit a similar decrease. EIH athletes had a greater decrease in VO2max at altitude compared to non-EIH and untrained groups (-22 ± 7.9%, -16 ± 5.3% and -13 ± 9.4%, respectively). At altitude, non-EIH athletes had a similar drop in SpO2 as EIH athletes (13 ± 0.8%) but greater than untrained participants (6 ± 1.0%). EIH athletes showed greater decrease in maximal heart rate than non-EIH athletes at alti- tude (8 ± 3.3 bpm and 5 ± 2.9 bpm, respectively).
Conclusion
EIH athletes demonstrated specific cardiorespiratory response to exercise at moderate altitude compared to non-EIH athletes with a higher decrease in VO2max certainly due to the lower ventilator and HRmax responses. Thus EIH phenomenon developed at sea-level negatively impact performance and cardiorespiratory responses at acute moderate altitude despite no potentiated O2 desaturation.

http://DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0161819

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